Saturday, June 3, 2017

Song Calling Theresa May a 'Liar' Tops Music Charts

teleSUR | Jun 2, 2017

A new song calling Prime Minister Theresa May a "liar, liar" has topped the charts. | Photo: Reuters
Captain SKA has promised to donate all revenue from song downloads to an anti-austerity activism group and U.K. food banks.

A new remix criticizing United Kingdom Prime Minister Theresa May has topped the music charts, just under a week before the United Kingdom goes to the polls to elect a new prime minister.

The song “Liar Liar GE2017” by London-based band Captain SKA reached number one on Amazon’s U.K. singles download list Thursday and was ranked second on the U.K. iTunes top songs chart.

First released in 2010 as a criticism of David Cameron’s austerity policies, the song has been remixed as an attack against May and her long history of political backtracking.

“Liar Liar GE2017” accuses May of reneging on key promises, particularly her decision to hold snap elections, despite assurances that there would be no election until 2020.


The chorus of the song goes  “She’s a liar, a liar, no, no, no, no. You can’t trust her.”

The music video, which has received over 1.7 million views on YouTube since May 25, ends with the message “On June 8, Tories Out. You can't trust Theresa May."

While “Liar Liar GE2017” has been an internet hit, local radio stations have refused to play the anti-Tory tune, including the BBC, the U.K. state broadcaster, which argued the song broke impartiality rules.

This decision has been widely lambasted by commentators as “censorship.”

“The BBC has banned the anti-May song 'Liar Liar' because it's bosses are too weak to stand up to the government,” wrote Sunny Hundal, a writer for the U.K. Independent, on his Twitter account.

Captain SKA has promised to donate all revenue from song downloads to an anti-austerity activism group and U.K. food banks.

The success of the anti-May song comes as polls show Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn encroaching upon the prime minister’s lead.

The latest YouGov survey suggested May would lose 20 seats and her 17-seat working majority in the 650-seat British parliament — this means May would be well short of the 326 seats needed to form a government.

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