Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Police Change Story on Killing of Texas Teen Jordan Edwards Following Video Evidence

teleSUR | May 2, 2017

Jordan Edwards' family wants to see the officer fired and criminally charged. | Photo: Reuters
“They have a dead child, they have the identity of the shooter, and they have no explanation for the shooting,” the Edward’s family lawyer said.

The police’s original account of the killing of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards, who was shot in the head with a rifle by an officer in Texas this weekend, was vastly different than what video evidence of the incident revealed.

The Police Department in Balch Springs, Texas, had said on Sunday that the officer, whose identity has not yet been released, shot at the car carrying the teenager because it was reversing down a street toward the officer in an “aggressive manner.”

But on Monday, Jonathan Haber, the police chief, said footage showed the exact opposite — that the car was “moving forward as the officers approached,” according to the Associated Press.


“There were no weapons involved; there was no aggressive behavior; these were not suspects,” Lee Merritt, a lawyer for the Edwards family, told The New York Times. “The lone motive they had for the murder was that the vehicle was being used as a weapon, and now that is no longer there.”

“They have a dead child, they have the identity of the shooter, and they have no explanation for the shooting,” he added. “They have more than sufficient probable cause to make an arrest.”

Edwards, a high-achieving student and football player, was well-liked by peers and teachers alike. That fateful Saturday he had been leaving a party with a group of friends when police had responded to a call about drunken people in the area. Merritt said there was no alcohol found in the car Edwards was in, as well as no evidence that any of the passengers had been drinking.



Since the ordeal, people have been reacting with outrage on social media, using the hashtag #JordanEdwards.

His family wants to see the officer fired and criminally charged.

“This has happened far too often,” Merritt said. “We are tired of making the same rhetorical demands, of having the same hashtags.”



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